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1 1830 ~ Frédéric Chopin left Warsaw for Paris, never to return. He was presented a cup of Polish soil on this day.

OCMS1902 ~ Eugen Jochum, German conductor

OCMS1921 ~ Jan Tausinger, Rumanian-born Czech composer

OCMS1923 ~ Victoria de Los Angeles, Spanish soprano

OCMS1926 ~ Lou Donaldson, Alto saxophone, singer

OCMS1937 ~ 'Whispering' Bill (James) Anderson, Songwriter, singer

OCMS1940 ~ Barry Sadler, Songwriter, singer

OCMS1944 ~ Keith Emerson, Keyboards with Emerson, Lake & Powell as well as Emerson, Lake & Palmer

OCMS1944 ~ Chris Morris, Guitarist with Paper Lace

OCMS1945 ~ Rick Grech, Bassist, violinist

OCMS1950 ~ Dan Peek, Guitarist, singer with America

OCMS1951 ~ Ronald Bell, Saxophone with Kool & The Gang

OCMS1957 ~ Lyle Lovett, Grammy Award-winning singer, Best Male Country Vocal in 1989

OCMS1959 ~ Eddie MacDonald, Bass with The Alarm

OCMS1962 ~ Rick Allen, Drummer with Def Leppard

OCMS1962 ~ Mags Furuholmen, Keyboards, singer with a-ha

OCMS1968 ~ George Harrison's soundtrack LP, "Wonderwall", was released. It was the first solo album by one of The Beatles. The album was also the first on the new Apple label.

OCMS1969 ~ Warner Brothers Records added Faces, to its roster. They fared OK, but even better when lead singer Rod Stewart stepped out to become a superstar on his own. The group's former label, Mercury, capitalized on the fact by releasing Maggie Mae and three other Faces tunes before Stewart went solo for Warner exclusively.

OCMS1969 ~ The last album of The Beatles reached #1 on the album chart. "Abbey Road" was the top LP for eleven nonconsecutive weeks.

OCMS1975 ~ Elton John's Island Girl hit number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. The song parked itself at the top of the hit heap for 3 weeks.

2    OCMS 1739 ~ Karl Ditters von Dittersdorf, Austrian composer and violinist
More information about Dittersdorf

OCMS1937 ~ Earl 'Speedoo' Carroll, Singer with these groups the Carnations, the Cadillacs and the Coasters

OCMS1938 ~ Jay Black (David Blatt), Singer with Jay and The Americans

OCMS1941 ~ Brian Poole, Singer with Brian Poole & The Tremeloes

OCMS1941 ~ Bruce Welch (Cripps), Guitarist with The Shadows

OCMS1944 ~ Keith Emerson, British rock keyboardist

OCMS1946 ~ Giuseppe Sinopoli, Italian conductor and composer

OCMS1952 ~ Maxine Nightingale, Singer

OCMS1955 ~ The first pop song by Julie London appeared on the charts. London's smoky and sultry rendition of Cry Me a River stayed on the pop chart for five months, reaching as high as #9. Julie was Mrs. Jack Webb (Dragnet) and Mrs. Bobby Troup (songwriter, trumpeter).

OCMS1958 ~ Billboard magazine introduced a new chart. It ranked the top singles in order, from number 1 to 100. Previously, only 30 records had been on the weekly hit list.

OCMS1963 ~ After giving benefit performances for years, singer Kate Smith presented her first full concert performance to a paying crowd at Carnegie Hall in New York City.

OCMS1968 ~ Another biggie for Stevie Wonder went on sale. For Once in My Life reached #2 on the pop charts on December 28, 1968.

OCMS1974 ~ The first of the former Beatles to try a nationwide concert tour was in Los Angeles, appearing at the Forum. Unfortunately, only half the house was filled to see George Harrison. He stopped touring soon thereafter.

OCMS1985 ~ On this day, for only the second time, a TV soundtrack LP topped the album charts. "Miami Vice" (title track by Jan Hammer) enjoyed a run of 11 (nonconsecutive) weeks. The only other TV soundtrack LP to chart at #1 was Henry Mancini's "Peter Gunn" in 1959.

3    1587 ~ Samuel Scheidt, German organist and composer

OCMS1801 ~ Vincenzo Bellini, Italian composer

1911 ~ Vladimir Ussachevsky, Russian-born American composer
More information about Ussachevsky

OCMS1933 ~ John Barry, Academy Award~winning composer

OCMS1941 ~ The classic Jerry Gray arrangement of String of Pearls was recorded by the Glenn Miller Orchestra on Bluebird 78s. The recording featured the trumpet of Bobby Hackett.

OCMS1948 ~ Lulu (Marie McDonald McLaughlin Lawrie), Singer. She changed her name to Lulu (and The Luvvers) in Scotland, early in her career. Married to singer Maurice Gibb

OCMS1954 ~ Adam Ant (Stuart Goddard), Singer

OCMS1956 ~ The classic MGM film, The Wizard of Oz, was first seen on television. The film cost CBS $250,000 to show. The movie was shown 18 times between 1956 and 1976, and you can probably catch it again no matter what year it is.

OCMS1957 ~ Sam Phillips, owner of legendary Sun Records in Memphis, TN, released Great Balls of Fire, by Jerry Lee Lewis. Looking carefully at the original label, one will find credit to Lewis and "his pumping piano."

OCMS1960 ~ James Prime, Keyboards with Deacon Blue

OCMS1960 ~ "The Unsinkable Molly Brown", opened on Broadway. The play would become an American theater standard and a smashing career launch for Shirley MacLaine.

OCMS1962 ~ Billboard magazine dropped the "Western" from its chart title. The list has been known as Hot Country Singles ever since.

OCMS1972 ~ Singers Carly Simon and James Taylor were married in Carly's Manhattan apartment. The couple was said to be the highest-paid couple in the world next to Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton. Carly and 'Sweet Baby' James would divorce years later, but they are still good friends.

OCMS1990 ~ Mary Martin died

OCMS2000 ~ Mary Hunter Wolf, one of the first female directors on Broadway died at the age of 95. Wolf made her Broadway debut directing the 1944 production of Horton Foote's "Only the Heart." The following year, she directed the first black Broadway musical, "Carib Song." After directing a string of successful plays and musicals, Wolf was hired as an associate director for Jerome Robbins' "Peter Pan," starring Mary Martin. In 1947 Wolf was tapped to direct a new musical "High Button Shoes," but was dismissed by the show's producers before rehearsals began. Wolf sued, charging that her contract had been broken because she was a woman. Two years later the New York Supreme Court ruled in her favor. During her third year at Wellesley College, Wolf visited her aunt, author Mary Austin, in Santa Fe, N.M. where she found herself introduced into the circle of D.H Lawrence, Willa Cather and Sinclair Lewis. She soon abandoned her studies to pursue a directing career.

4    OCMS Election Day OCMS Karl Tausig (1841) Polish pianist

OCMS1847 ~ Felix Mendelssohn died
More information about Mendelssohn

OCMS1922 ~ Paul Rovsing Olsen, Danish composer, ethnomusicologist and music critic

OCMS1922 ~ Anthony Vazzana, American composer

OCMS1938 ~ Harry Elston, Musician with Friends of Distinction

OCMS1938 ~ You're a Sweet Little Headache, from the movie "Paris Honeymoon", was recorded by Bing Crosby on Decca.

OCMS1940 ~ Delbert McClinton, Songwriter, singer

OCMS1947 ~ Mike Smith, Musician, saxophone

OCMS1954 ~ Florence Henderson, who was all of 20 years old, joined with Ezio Pinza and Walter Slezak in "Fanny". The show lit up Broadway 888 times.

OCMS1962 ~ Bob Dylan gave his first major concert outside of Greenwich Village. The Carnegie Hall solo appearance was not well attended.

OCMS1963 ~ The Beatles played a Royal Command Performance as part of an evening of entertainment for Queen Elizabeth at the Prince of Wales Theatre in London. David Frost was the emcee.

OCMS1984 ~ The Artist Formerly Known as Prince kicked off his fall tour in Detroit. He broke the record for sold-out performances at the 20,000-seat Joe Louis Arena. The previous record-holder was The Artist Still Known as Neil Diamond, in 1983.

OCMS2000 ~ Vernel Fournier, who was a drummer for premier jazz acts such as Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie, passed away after suffering an aneurysm. He was 72. Fournier, a New Orleans native, took lessons from a Bourbon Street drummer and as a teen played in New Orleans. He performed with jazz singers including Nancy Wilson and Billy Eckstine. He moved from New York City, where he lived for more than 30 years, to Madison County in 1998.

5    1895 ~ Walter Gieseking, German pianist

OCMS1912 ~ Roy Rogers (Leonard Slye) 'King of the Cowboys', singer, married to Dale Evans

OCMS1929 ~ McKinney's Cotton Pickers picked and fiddled their way to the Victor studios to record Plain Dirt. Among those pickin' and grinnin' were luminaries such as Fats Waller (on piano), Benny Carter and Coleman Hawkins.

OCMS1931 ~ Ike Turner, American soul-rock singer, pianist and guitarist, duo with Ike and Tina Turner Revue, owner of a recording studio

OCMS1936 ~ Billy Sherrill, Songwriter, musician: saxophone, record producer, VP/Executive Producer of CBS Nashville

OCMS1941 ~ Art Garfunkel, American folk-rock singer, songwriter and actor, duo ~ Simon and Garfunkel

OCMS1942 ~ George M. Cohan passed away at the age of 64. Cohan was a legendary songwriter whose spirited and star~spangled tunes lit up Broadway and will be a part of Americana forever.
More information about Cohan

OCMS1946 ~ Gram Parsons (Cecil Ingram Connor), Singer with The Byrds, songwriter

OCMS1947 ~ Peter Noone (Peter Blair Denis Bernard Noone), Guitarist, piano, singer, Herman of Herman's Hermits, actor

OCMS1955 ~ The Vienna State Opera House in Austria formally opened, celebrating the end of 17 years of foreign occupation.

OCMS1959 ~ Bryan Adams, Singer, songwriter

OCMS1963 ~ Andrea McArdle, Actress, singer in Annie

OCMS1977 ~ Guy Lombardo passed away at the age of 75. He was a musical fixture for decades, especially on New Year's Eve. Guy Lombardo, leader of the Royal Canadians, is fondly remembered for many songs he made famous but his most popular remains Auld Lang Syne.

OCMS1986 ~ Dick Clark registered for an initial public stock offering for his TV production company (DCP). On the registration form, he called his product 'mind candy'.

OCMS1989 ~ Vladimir Horowitz passed away Read more about Horowitz

OCMS1989 ~ Barry Sadler passed away

OCMS2000 ~ Frances Mercer, a leading model of the 1930s who went on to star in films, radio, television and on Broadway, died at the age of 85. Chosen as one of New York's most beautiful models while still in her teens, Mercer made her film debut in 1938 playing Ginger Rogers' rival for James Stewart's affections in "Vivacious Lady." In the next two years Mercer made eight more movies, including "The Mad Miss Manton" opposite Barbara Stanwyck. In theater work, she had costarring roles in the Broadway musicals "All the Things You Are" and "Something for the Boys." Mercer also had her own New York-based radio show, "Sunday Night at Nine." On TV, Mercer played a vituperative mother-in-law on the soap opera "For Better or Worse" and surgical nurse Ann Talbot in the 1955-1957 syndicated series, "Dr. Hudson's Secret Journal."

OCMS2000 ~ Jack O'Brian, a newspaper columnist and Associated Press critic who wrote about television and Broadway gossip, died at the age of 86. O'Brian chronicled soap opera plot twists and celebrities and the quiz show scandals of the 1950s. The cultural figures who met with his approval included Bert Lahr, Perry Como and Walter Cronkite. He took a job as a cub reporter with a Buffalo newspaper and established a reputation for cantankerousness when he skewered the local orchestra's young accordionists. He joined the AP as its drama and movie critic in 1943. Later, he wrote about television and Broadway for a string of newspapers and a nationally syndicated column. He also hosted a WOR-AM radio show.

6    OCMS 1814 ~ Adolphe Sax, Belgian instrumentalist, inventor of the saxophone and saxotromba
More information about Sax

1854 ~ John Phillip Sousa, American bandmaster and composer; "The March King" Read quotes by and about Sousa
More information about Sousa

OCMS1860 ~ Ignace Jan Paderewski, Composer, pianist, Polish patriot, First Premier of Poland (1919), brought white Zinfandel wine grapes to U.S. for the first time
More information about Ignace Jan Paderewski

OCMS1916 ~ Ray Conniff, American conductor, arranger and composer of popular music, trombonist

OCMS1932 ~ Stonewall Jackson, Singer

OCMS1936 ~ This was the day that big band icon Woody Herman played in his first recording session. He recorded Wintertime Dreams on Decca disc #1056.

OCMS1937 ~ Eugene Pitt, Singer

OCMS1938 ~ P.J. Proby (James Smith), Singer

OCMS1940 ~ Guy Lombardo and the Royal Canadians recorded one of their lesser-known songs for Decca. It was The Moon Fell in the River.

OCMS1941 ~ Doug Sahm, Singer, founded Sir Douglas Quintet

OCMS1943 ~ Mike Clifford, Singer

OCMS1947 ~ George Young, Guitarist with The Easybeats

OCMS1948 ~ Glenn Frey, Songwriter, singer with The Eagles

OCMS2001 ~ John Denman, a clarinetist who was most recently artistic adviser to the Tucson Symphony Orchestra's pops division, died from complications of esophageal cancer. He was 68. Denman, a native of London, was a principal clarinetist for the orchestra for more than 20 years. Denman also played principal clarinet with the London Symphony Orchestra and the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra. He taught music at Trinity College in England before coming to teach at the University of Arizona. He joined the Tucson Symphony Orchestra in the late 1970s. In 1984, Denman left the University of Arizona after failing to receive tenure. For the rest of his life, he focused on his performing career. He also designed a small clarinet, the Kinder-Klari, to make practicing easier for young hands. Denman performed and recorded with jazz icon Buddy DeFranco and was a member of several jazz bands.

OCMS2002 ~ Maria Johansson, an organist who became a local legend for singing religious songs and hymns in one of Stockholm's main squares every day for nearly three decades, died at the age of 84. The daughter of a preacher, Johansson often served homemade sandwiches to the poor during breaks in her daily performance. At one point, she went to work at a bakery to help pay for the sandwiches, her husband said.

7    1922 ~ Al Hirt, Trumpeter, Flight of the Bumble Bee as theme song for TV's The Green Hornet, played in singer Don Gibson's band, regular on Make Your Own Kind of Music

OCMS1926 ~ Dame Joan Sutherland, Australian coloratura soprano

OCMS1930 ~ The Waltz You Save for Me, by 'The Waltz King' himself, Wayne King, was recorded on Victor. It became King's theme.

OCMS1937 ~ Mary Travers, American folk singer, Mary of Peter, Paul and Mary

OCMS1938 ~ Dee (Delectus) Clark, Singer

OCMS1942 ~ Johnny Rivers (John Ramistella), Singer

OCMS1943 ~ Joni Mitchell, Canadian folk-rock singer, songwriter and guitarist

OCMS1947 ~ Billboard magazine began listing the top 15 popular records. Only 10 songs had been featured previously.

OCMS1956 ~ Elvis Presley hit the charts with Love Me. The song was the first million-seller to make the charts without being released as a single. It was, instead, an EP (extended play) 45 rpm, with three other songs on it: Rip It Up, Paralyzed and When My Blue Moon Turns to Gold Again on RCA Victor.

OCMS1970 ~ Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is? was released by Columbia. It became the third tune by Chicago to hit the pop music charts. Make Me Smile and 25 or 6 to 4 were previous hits. Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is? made it to #7 on the charts, January 7, 1971.

OCMS1976 ~ Gone With the Wind was aired (over two nights) on NBC-TV. The showing was the highest-rated TV show in history. 65 percent of all viewers turned on their sets to watch Scarlet O'Hara and Rhett Butler.

OCMS1978 ~ Nick Gilder, Singer

OCMS1979 ~ The Rose, starring Bette Midler, got star treatment with a world premiere in Los Angeles. The movie was modeled after the life of Janis Joplin.

OCMS2000 ~ Doug Nelson, bassist in teen blues star Jonny Lang's band, was killed when he was hit by a pickup truck on a rural highway in northern Minnesota. He was 46. Nelson began playing professionally at age 15. He worked in Los Angeles for a time and toured with Olivia Newton-John, before returning in the late 1980s to the Twin Cities, where he played with local bands. He joined Lang's group about three years ago.

OCMS2000 ~ Columbia Legacy and Verve released a five-CD box set companion titled "Ken Burns Jazz: The Story of American Music" in addition to 22 individual artist discs. Read the newsitem

OCMS2001 ~ Gene Wooten, a dobro player who backed Patty Loveless, the Osborne Brothers, Wilma Lee Cooper and other country stars, died from complications of lung cancer. He was 49. "He was like a teacher for everyone," said mandolinist Roland White. "He was like our guru. He just helped everybody in music. ... There was no ego ever - ever - and that's hard to find." Wooten, a native of Franklinton, N.C., attended Appalachian State University in Boone, N.C., where he began his career in music. He moved to Nashville in

OCMS1977 and was hired by Cooper. Wooten played on the Mountain Soul album by Loveless this year. He was voted best dobro player three times by the Society for the Preservation of Bluegrass in America.

8    8 1793 ~ The Louvre Museum opened in Paris.

OCMS1880 ~ Sarah Bernhardt made her American stage debut. Bernhardt appeared in Adrienne Lecouvreur in New York City.

OCMS1890 ~ Composer César Franck died in Paris

OCMS1921 ~ Jerome Hines, American bass
More about Jerome Hines

OCMS1924 ~ Sergei Mikhailovich Liapunov

OCMS1927 ~ Patti Page, American singer of popular music

OCMS1927 ~ Chris Conner, Singer

OCMS1932 ~ The team of Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein II debuted with their show, Make Mine Music. The Broadway production continued for 342 performances.

OCMS1939 ~ This day marked Frank Sinatra's last recording session with the Harry James Band. Sides recorded were Every Day of My Life and Ciribiribin.

OCMS1939 ~ "Life With Father" premiered on Broadway in New York City. Eight years later, the show broke the existing record for longest-running stage production.

OCMS1941 ~ Rodney Slater, Saxophone, trumpet with The Bonzo Dog Doo-Dah Band

OCMS1944 ~ Bonnie Bramlett, Songwriter, singer with Delaney and Bonnie and Friends

OCMS1946 ~ Roy Wood (Ulysses Adrian Wood), Singer, songwriter, formed Electric Light Orchestra

OCMS1947 ~ Minnie (Julia) Riperton, Singer

OCMS1949 ~ Alan Berger, Bass with Southside Johnny & The Asbury Jukes

OCMS1949 ~ Bonnie Raitt, American blues-rock singer and guitarist, won the Grammy Award in 1990, daughter of actor, John Raitt

OCMS1954 ~ Ricki Lee Jones, Singer

OCMS1958 ~ Terry Lee Miall, Drummer with Adam & The Ants

OCMS1964 ~ Judy Garland and her daughter, Liza Minnelli, appeared together at the London Palladium. The program was shown on U.S. TV; and the LP, Live at the London Palladium became a classic on Capitol Records.

OCMS1967 ~ The first solo movie by a Beatle opened in the U.S. It was John Lennon's How I Won the War.

OCMS2003 ~ Henry Phace Roberts, a tap dancer who performed with the Copasetics, the Five Blazers and the Three Rockets, died. He was 92. Roberts performed on television on "The Tonight Show" and "The Ed Sullivan S Show" and was in the films "Cabin in the Sky," "Stormy Weather" and "The Cotton Club." Born in Savannah, Ga., he was trained to tap dance on the streets as a child. Roberts began dancing professionally at 14, and performed for the last time at 87 with the Copasetics on a European tour.

9    OCMS Alice S. OCMS

OCMS1881 ~ Johannes Brahms gave the first performance of his Piano Concert No.2 in Budapest.

OCMS1899 ~ "Mezz" Mezzrow, American jazz clarinetist and saxophonist

OCMS1929 ~ Piero Cappuccili, Italian baritone

OCMS1930 ~ Ivan Moravec, Czech pianist

OCMS1938 ~ 24-year-old Mary Martin made her Broadway stage debut in the musical comedy "Leave It to Me". She brought down the house as she sang My Heart Belongs to Daddy. And the critics raved about New York's bright new star. The following year brought Martin a top-ten hit with the same song. Martin suddenly found herself singing duets with Bing Crosby; starring on "Broadway in One Touch of Venus" in 1943; "Lute Song" in 1946; touring in "Annie Get Your Gun"; and then taking on what would become her immortal role, that of Nellie in "South Pacific". South Pacific was one of Broadway's biggest hits and the cast album was one of the first of its kind, also a big seller. Then came Mary's stage and TV performances as Peter Pan. This would become her signature role, a memorable moment as the petite actress flew through the air with Tinkerbell and fought the dangerous Captain Hook. Broadway called to Mary Martin again in 1959 for "The Sound of Music" and once more in 1966 for "I Do, I Do". Back in 1951, Mary Martin recorded a duet with a young man who was also destined for instant and long-term stardom. The song they sang together was Get Out Those Old Records. The twenty-year-old was her son, Larry Hagman, who later played J.R. Ewing. This is one man that Mary Martin didn't want to wash out of her hair!

OCMS1955 ~ Harry Belafonte recorded Jamaica Farewell and Come Back Liza for RCA Victor. The two tunes completed the Calypso album which led to Belafonte's nickname, 'Calypso King'.

OCMS1967 ~ The first issue of Rolling Stone was published. John Lennon was on the cover. The magazine said it was not simply a music magazine but was also about "...the things and attitudes that music embraces."

OCMS2003 ~ Saxophonist Buddy Arnold, who performed with such jazz greats as Stan Kenton, Buddy Rich and Tommy Dorsey and co-founded a program to help musicians suffering from drug and alcohol abuse, died at the age of age 77. Born Arnold Buddy Grishaver, he began playing the saxophone at age 9. And by the time he was 16, he was touring as a professional sideman and performing at the Apollo Theater in Harlem with bandleader George Auld. After serving in the Army during World War II, Arnold joined the band of super-drummer Buddy Rich on a West Coast tour. Arnold earned his first recording credits in 1949 on the Mercury Records release of Gene Williams and the Junior Thornhill Band, and he toured with clarinetist Buddy DeFranco's orchestra in 1951. But he soon descended into a decades-long struggle with drug addiction. Although he landed a recording contract with ABC Paramount in 1956 following an 18-month hospitalization, he was sentenced to prison in

OCMS1958 on an attempted burglary conviction. Pardoned two years later, he played with the Dorsey Band and toured with Stan Kenton. He later settled in Los Angeles and recorded four albums for Capitol Records. Arnold took a job in a drug treatment program after his early release from prison and went on to establish the Musician's Assistance Program with his wife, Carole Fields, in 1992. The organization, dedicated to helping needy musicians obtain treatment for drug and alcohol addiction, has served more than 1,500 individuals during the past decade.

10    OCMS Ashleigh H. OCMS

OCMS1483 ~ Martin Luther, German religious reformer, composer of hymns and flutist

1668 ~ François Couperin, French composer and organist Read more about Couperin

OCMS1888 ~ Fritz Kreisler, a 13-year-old violinist from Vienna, made his American debut in New York City.

OCMS1900 ~ "Floradora" opened in New York City this day. The play was received by cheering audiences.

OCMS1939 ~ Muggsy Spanier and his band recorded Dipper Mouth Blues on Bluebird Records.

1944 ~ Tim Rice, British author and librettist Read more about Rice

OCMS1956 ~ Billie Holiday returned to the New York City stage at Carnegie Hall after a three-year absence. The concert was called a high point in jazz history.

OCMS1969 ~ On this day, twenty years after the first release of "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer", Gene Autry received a gold record for the single.

OCMS1969 ~ "Can you tell me how to get ... how to get to Sesame Street?" The classic, "Sesame Street" debuted on 170 Public Broadcasting stations and 20 commercial outlets. Created by the Children's Television Workshop, the show starred endearing characters including Gordon, Susan, Bob, Bert, Ernie, the Cookie Monster, Oscar the Grouch and, of course, Big Bird!

OCMS1986 ~ "Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band Live/1975-85", the long-anticipated album by 'The Boss', hit record stores this day. Fans made the LP a one~day sellout, buying over a million copies and generating more first-day dollars than any record in 30 years. It's a five-disc, 40-song set.

OCMS1994 ~ Carmen McRae passed away

11    OCMS Veteran's Day OCMS

OCMS1918 ~ This is Armistice Day or Remembrance Day or Veterans Day or Victory Day or World War I Memorial Day. The name of this special day may be different in different places throughout many nations; but its significance is the same. It was on this day, at 11 a.m., that World War I ceased. The Allied and Central Powers signed an armistice agreement at 5 a.m. in Marshal Foch's railway car in the Forest of Compiegne, France. Even today, many still bow their heads in remembrance at the 11th hour of this the 11th day of the 11th month.

OCMS1883 ~ Ernst Ansermet, Swiss conductor

OCMS1927 ~ Mose Allison, American jazz pianist, trumpeter and singer

OCMS1929 ~ Dick Clark, TV producer, host of American Bandstand, former Philadelphia DJ

OCMS1929 ~ Andy Kirk and his orchestra recorded "Froggy Bottom" in Kansas City.

OCMS1931 ~ Leslie Parnas, American cellist

OCMS1932 ~ The National Broadcasting Company opened its new studios at Radio City in New York City. They celebrated with a gala program at Radio City Music Hall.

OCMS1938 ~ Kate Smith sang God Bless America for the very first time. It would later become her signature song. Irving Berlin penned the tune in 1917 but never released it until Miss Smith sang it for the first time on her radio broadcast. Actually, the song was then 20 years old, but it had never been publicly performed before.

OCMS1944 ~ Frank Sinatra began a long and successful career with Columbia Records.

OCMS1974 ~ Leonardo DiCaprio, American actor

OCMS1979 ~ Dimitri Tiomkin passed away

OCMS1992 ~ Erskine Hawkins passed away

OCMS2000 ~ Isadore Granoff, a Ukrainian immigrant who started teaching violin lessons as a teen-ager and built a famed music school in Philadelphia, died in his sleep at the age of 99. Granoff taught Dizzy Gillespie, John Coltrane and others during more than a half- century at the Granoff School of Music. Granoff taught amateurs and professionals. Some of his students went on to become prominent players of classical music, jazzjazz, swing, big band and Latin sounds. Granoff sold the school in 1970 and later stepped down from the board of directors, renouncing the new owner's promotional tactics.

12    OCMS 1833 ~ Alexander Borodin, Russian composer Links to more information about Borodin

OCMS1920 ~ Jo Stafford, Singer

OCMS1925 ~ Louis Armstrong recorded "My Heart", starting a career that brought him worldwide fame.

OCMS1939 ~ Lucia Popp, Czech soprano

OCMS1940 ~ Walt Disney released "Fantasia". One critic called the film "As terrific as anything that has ever happened on the screen."

OCMS1941 ~ Hot Lips Page performed the vocal for Artie Shaw's very long and very slow version of St. James Infirmary on RCA Victor.

OCMS1943 ~ Brian Hyland, Singer

OCMS1943 ~ John Maus, Bass, singer with the trio, The Walker Brothers

OCMS1944 ~ Booker T. Jones, Musician with Booker T and the MG's

OCMS1945 ~ Neil Young, Canadian folk-rock singer, songwriter and guitarist, with Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young

OCMS1948 ~ Errol Brown, Songwriter with Tony Wilson singer with Hot Chocolate

OCMS1950 ~ Barbara Fairchild, Singer

OCMS1955 ~ Leslie McKeown, Singer with The Bay City Rollers

OCMS1967 ~ Pearl Bailey took over the lead in the Broadway musical, "Hello Dolly". 'Pearlie Mae' was a smash hit in the role.

OCMS1970 ~ After a successful London run, Anthony Quayle starred in the Broadway opening of "Sleuth".

OCMS1980 ~ John Lennon's "Starting Over" was released. John and Yoko were seen kissing on the record cover.

OCMS1983 ~ Lionel Richie began the first of four consecutive weeks at the top of the music charts as All Night Long (All Night) became the most popular song in the U.S.

OCMS2001 ~ Broadway composer Albert Hague, who won a Tony for his work on Redhead and who played the part of cranky music teacher Benjamin Shorofsky in the Fame movie and television series, died of cancer. He was 81. Hague composed the music for many Broadway shows, including The Fig Leaves Are Falling, Plain and Fancy, Cafe Crown and Miss Moffat, which starred Bette Davis. He won his Tony in 1959. He also wrote the music for the animated TV classic How the Grinch Stole Christmas and appeared in a number of movies, including the Michael Jordan- Bugs Bunny comedy Space Jam, in which he played a psychiatrist. It was his long-running role as white-bearded, German-accented teacher Shorofsky that brought him to Los Angeles. He played the part for five years on TV. Other TV acting credits included guest appearances on such shows as Hotel, Beauty and the Beast and Tales From the Dark Side. Born Albert Marcuse in Berlin, Hague fled his native Germany for Rome with his mother in 1937 after the Nazis came to power. He eventually settled in the United States, where he studied music at the University of Cincinnati and was adopted by Dr. Elliott B. Hague, an eye surgeon. In recent years, he and his late wife, actress Renee Orin Hague, had a successful cabaret act, appearing at Carnegie Hall two years ago.

OCMS2003 ~ Guy Livingston, a theater maven and journalist who reviewed stage performances for Variety, died. He was 92. After serving in World War II, Livingston became a drama critic for Variety, traveling between Boston and New York reviewing musicals. Later, he became a press agent for many musicals, as well as for musical artists, among them Judy Garland, Nat 'King' Cole and Ray Charles.

OCMS2003 ~ Tony Thompson, the driving force behind such groups as Chic and the Power Station, and a drummer whose effortless ability to move from jazz to rock to funk made him a prized session man, died of renal cell cancer. He was 48. The drummer was noted not only for keeping perfect time but also for subtle cymbal syncopation and raw power, talents that kept him in demand as a session player for such stars as Madonnas, David Bowie, Diana Ross, Patti LaBelle and Sister Sledge. By the late 1970s, Chic was one of the most popular groups of the disco era. The group sold millions of records beginning with the hit single Dance, Dance, Dance in 1977. Other hits included the singles Le Freak and Good Times and the albums C'est Chic and Risque. After the group disbanded in 1983, Thompson kept busy as a session player, appearing on Sister Sledge's We Are Family album in 1979, Bowie's Let's Dance in 1983 and Madonna's Like a Virgin in 1984. He also appeared on Mick Jagger's solo album She's The Boss in 1985. That same year, Thompson and others formed Power Station. The group's hits included Some Like it Hot.

13    1817 ~ Louis Lefébure-Wély, French organist and composer

OCMS1854 ~ George Whitefield Chadwick, American composer and conductor

OCMS1921 ~ Loonas Kokkonen, Finnish composer

OCMS1943 ~ Leonard Bernstein replaced an indisposed Bruno Walter as conductor of the New York Philharmonic Orchestra. Thus began a legendary career and worldwide appreciation for Bernstein's many compositions with the orchestra.

OCMS1951 ~ Nicolai Karlovich Medtner died

OCMS1965 ~ Julie Harris starred in "Skyscraper", which opened on Broadway in New York City. The musical ran for seven months.

OCMS1968 ~ This was a good day for The Beatles. Their movie, "Yellow Submarine", premiered in the U.S. and the single, Hey Jude, topped the pop music charts (it was in its 7th of 9 weeks at #1).

OCMS1975 ~ Whoa Whoa Whoa, Feeeelings. One of the great lounge-lizard songs of all time, Feelings by Morris Albert, went gold.

OCMS1999 ~ Donald Mills passed away

OCMS2000 ~ Cecil Blackwood, a gospel singer who was a member of the Blackwood Brothers and crooned with Elvis Presley, of cancer at the age of 66. The Blackwood Brothers, who have won nine Grammys and 20 Dove awards, were a favorite of Elvis Presley, who briefly sang with Cecil Blackwood in a group named the Songfellows. The Blackwood Brothers were formed in 1934, the same year Blackwood was born in Ackerman, Miss. He became the group's baritone in 1954. The Blackwood Brothers have recorded 300 albums, backed country stars Porter Wagoner and Barbara Mandrell, and are members of the Southern Gospel Music Hall of Fame.

OCMS2000 ~ Jimmy Payne Sr., a tap dancer whose rhythm and technique as well as a mastery of precise steps attracted Bob Fosse, June Allyson, Gregory Hines, Lena Horne and others to his Chicago studio, died Nov. 13 at the age of 95. The son of a Cuban mother and Barbadian father, Payne grew up in the Panama Canal Zone before moving to New York in 1917. After traveling from New York to Chicago in 1947, Payne helped introduce African and Afro-Cuban rhythms to the dance scene. He taught in a number of Chicago dance studios from the 1950s into the 1970s. He continued to teach some of the city's top dancers until his regimen was slowed by a number of strokes in his early 90s.

OCMS2000 ~ New York entertainment lawyer and tax expert Joseph Taubman, who wrote how- to books for people working in the business side of show business, died at the age of 81. Taubman's clients included Lionel Richie, Pete Seeger, Joan Baez and Arlo Guthrie. He also served as counsel to the National Film Board of Canada. Taubman wrote "Financing a Theatrical Production," and his treatises on various aspects of the entertainment business published in the 1970s remain in print.

OCMS2000 ~ The site, thebeatles.com, went live and is the band's only official presence on the Internet among a flood of unofficial fan sites.

OCMS2002 ~ Mieke van Hoek, a dance choreographer and teacher, died. She was 56. The Dutch-born van Hoek taught modern-dance choreography and dance improvisation at the Rotterdamse Dansacademie. After emigrating to the United States in 1977, van Hoek worked as a teaching assistant at the American Dance Festival in Durham, N.C., and studied at the Laban/Bartenieff Institute in New York. She founded a center for meditation, healing and the arts in Canones in 2000.

14    1778 ~ Johan Nepomuk Hummel, German pianist and composer

1900 ~ Aaron Copland, American composer and conductor Read quotes by and about Copland
More information about Copland

OCMS1904 ~ Art Hodes, Russian-born American jazz pianist

OCMS1915 ~ Martha Tilton, Singer, actress in The Benny Goodman Story, Sunny

OCMS1920 ~ Johnny Desmond (Giovanni DeSimone), Singer with the Bob-O-Links, the Bob Crosby Band, Glenn Miller AAF band, Don McNeill's Breakfast Club, Your Hit Parade, Face the Music and an actor

OCMS1921 ~ KYW radio, Chicago, IL broadcast the first opera by a professional company. Listeners heard Samson Et Dilila as it was being performed at the Chicago Auditorium.

OCMS1940 ~ Freddie Garrity, Singer with Freddie and the Dreamers

OCMS1944 ~ An outstanding array of musicians gathered in Hollywood to record a classic. Tommy Dorsey and orchestra made Opus No. 1, Victor record number 20-1608. Buddy Rich was the drummer in the session, Al Klink and Buddy DeFranco blew sax and Nelson Riddle played trombone on the Sy Oliver arrangement.

OCMS1948 ~ James Young, Guitarist with Styx

OCMS1951 ~ Stephen Bishop, Singer, guitarist, songwriter

OCMS1953 ~ Alexander O'Neal, Songwriter, singer

OCMS1954 ~ Yanni (Chrysomallis), Pianist, music used on broadcasts of: Tour de France, Olympic Games, World Series; swimmer on the Greek National Swim Team

OCMS1955 ~ Frankie Banali, Musician with Quiet Riot

OCMS1956 ~ Alec Such, Bass with Bon Jovi

OCMS1967 ~ The Monkees received a gold record for Daydream Believer.

OCMS1975 ~ They Just Can't Stop It (The Games People Play) became a gold record for the Spinners. Their other hits include Then Came You (with Dionne Warwick), Could It Be I'm Falling in Love, The Rubberband Man, Working My Way Back to You, Cupid, It's a Shame and I'll Be Around, for Motown.

OCMS1981 ~ For the second week in a row, Daryl Hall and John Oates owned the top spot on the pop music charts with Private Eyes.

OCMS2000 ~ David Wilson, drummer and backup vocalist for The Cascades, died at the age of 63. The Cascades were best known for their No. 1 1963 hit Rhythm of the Rain, as well as Second Chance and Shy Girl. Wilson was born in 1936 in Scotland and moved to the United States with his family six years later. After he joined the Navy, Wilson formed a band with songwriter John Gummoe and some friends in San Diego. They first called themselves the Thunder Notes, but later took the name The Cascades when they recorded Rhythm of the Rain. The single earned the group a gold record.

15    1905 ~ Mantovani, Orchestra leader, (1953 UK No.1 single 'Moulin Rouge', 1957 US No. 12 single 'Around The World In Eighty Days') was born. He died on 30th March 1980.

OCMS11914 ~ Jorge Bolet, Cuban-born American pianist

OCMS1926 ~ NBC broadcast its first music program. It featured the New York Symphony Orchestra and many distinguished soloists. 24 stations carried the first broadcast. The program was a gala 40-hour broadcast from the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York City. Two remote pickups were also on the program. Opera star Mary Garden sang from Chicago and Will Rogers presented a humorous monologue from Independence, Kansas. Charles Lindbergh was among the luminaries who attended the broadcast.

OCMS1928 ~ C.W. McCall (William Fries), Singer, songwriter

OCMS1932 ~ Petula Clark, British pop singer (Downtown, My Love)

OCMS1933 ~ Clyde (Lensley) McPhatter, Singer with the Dominoes

OCMS1937 ~ Little Willie John (William Edward John), Singer, convicted of manslaughter

1942 ~ Daniel Barenboim, Argentine-born Israeli pianist and conductor of English Chamber Orchestra Read quotes by and about Barenboim Read a newsitem about Barenboim

OCMS1945 ~ Anni-Frid Lyngstad, Singer with Abba

OCMS1946 ~ Janet Lennon, Singer with The Lennon Sisters

OCMS1954 ~ Tony Thompson, Drummer with Chic; played with Led Zeppelin, Live Aid, drummer with Patti LaBelle
More about Thompson

OCMS1954 ~ Studio One on CBS-TV featured Joan Weber singing Let Me Go, Lover. The song had enjoyed limited popularity before the TV show, but skyrocketed to fame immediately after.

OCMS1956 ~ Love Me Tender, the first Elvis Presley film, premiered.

OCMS1967 ~ Mari Fernandez, Singer with Sweet Sensation

OCMS1969 ~ The first album featuring Karen and Richard Carpenter was released by A&M Records. Offering would not be a big seller, but a single from the disc, a remake of The Beatles' Ticket to Ride, would gain national attention. Their next album, however, would establish them as major international stars (Close to You).

OCMS1974 ~ The most expensive 2-record album was released-on Casablanca Records. It was a comedy disc titled, Here's Johnny - Magic Moments from the Tonight Show.

OCMS1974 ~ The group, Faces, released their tune with the longest title. You Can Make Me Dance, Sing or Anything (Even Take the Dog for a Walk, Mend a Fuse, Fold Away the Ironing Board, Or Any Other Domestic Shortcomings).

OCMS1980 ~ After years of success on the music charts with the New Christy Minstrels and the First Edition, Kenny Rogers got his first #1 song. Lady, written by Lionel Richie, stayed at the top for six weeks.

OCMS1986 ~ The first major operetta written by Gian Carlo Menotti in over 20 years was presented at the Kennedy Center in Washington, DC. Starring tenor Placido Domingo, Goya was said by critics to be only "intermittently good."

OCMS2003 ~ David Holt, a former child actor once touted by Paramount Pictures as its answer to Shirley Temple, has died. He was 76. Holt, who later became a successful jazz musician and songwriter, died of congestive heart failure. Although his career never rivaled Temple's, Holt had his share of success as a child actor, playing Elizabeth Taylor's older brother in "Courage of Lassie" in 1946 and appearing as bratty Sidney Sawyer in "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer" in 1938. He also played the crippled boy for whom New York Yankee great Lou Gehrig hit a home run in "Pride of the Yankees" and appeared in "The Big Broadcast of 1936." Paramount signed Holt to a long-term contract after his 1934 role as a boy whose mother dies in "You Belong To me." Holt eventually segued into music. He co-wrote the song The Christmas Blues with Sammy Cahn and wrote the music for numerous jazz albums. He hosted the TV show "American Music Shop" in the 1990s.

16    OCMS 1873 ~ W.C. Handy, American blues composer and bandleader
More information about Handy

OCMS1889 ~ George S. (Simon) Kaufman, Playwright: The Cocoanuts, A Night at the Opera, with Moss Hart, The Man Who Came to Dinner, You Can't Take It with You

1895 ~ Paul Hindemith, German-born American composer and conductor Read quotes by and about Hindemith
More information about Hindemith

OCMS1896 ~ Lawrence Mervil Tibbett, American baritone

OCMS1905 ~ Eddie (Albert) Condon, Guitarist, bandleader, promoter of Dixieland Jazz

OCMS1908 ~ Conductor Arturo Toscanini made his debut in the United States this day. He appeared at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York, conducting Aida.

OCMS1931 ~ Bob Gibson, Singer, songwriter, leader of folk music movement in late '50s, duo of Gibson and (Bob) Camp

OCMS1932 ~ The Palace in New York City closed its doors. It was the most famous vaudeville theatre in America. Later, it became a movie house with live performances preceding the flicks; most notably: the team of Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis in their heyday.

OCMS1935 ~ The Rodgers and Hart musical, Jumbo, opened in New York City for a run of 233 performances.

OCMS1937 ~ Bob Crosby and his orchestra recorded South Rampart Street Parade on Decca Records.

OCMS1945 ~ Martine Van Hammel, Ballet, American Ballet Theatre

OCMS1955 ~ 'Tennessee' Ernie Ford drove to the top spot on the record charts on this day. Sixteen Tons, where he owed his "soul to the company store...", became the fastest-selling record in history, jumping to #1 in just 3 weeks. The tune, on Capitol Records, stayed at #1 for eight weeks.

OCMS1970 ~ Anne Murray received a gold record for Snowbird. She was the first Canadian recording artist to receive a gold record.

OCMS2000 ~ Russ Conway, a British pianist known as the "Prince Charming of Pop" who sold
More than 30 million records in the 1950s and '60s, died at age 75. He had 17 consecutive hits in the late 1950s and early 1960s, and won a silver disc when his record Roulette topped 250,000 sales - a total rapidly equaled by three other hits, Sidesaddle, China Tea and Snow Coach. Conway's formal piano education consisted of one lesson at age 4. He left school at 14 and got work in a lawyer's office. But he was sent to juvenile detention for three years for taking money he found in a package. In a detention center, he found a piano to play. While doing a stint as a pianist in a club, he was discovered by choreographer Irving Davies. He went on to provide piano accompaniment to a string of singers. Soon he was composing the songs that made him famous and won him the nicknames "Prince Charming of Pop" and the "Sheik of the Keyboard."

OCMS2001 ~ Blue guitarist and singer Isaac Scott, a major figure in the city's music scene for more than a quarter century, died of complications from diabetes. He was 56. A stream of musicians paid their respects to Scott, said his ex-wife, Eloise DePoe. He was found in his apartment Nov. 4 and never regained consciousness. Scott recorded several albums, including "The Isaac Scott Band," "Big Time Blues Man" and "High Class Woman." He also appeared on the compilation albums "Live at the San Francisco Jazz Festival" and "Live at the Roadhouse." Primarily a "cover artist," Scott did not write his own songs, which hindered national recognition. But he received several local honors, including the Washington Blues Society's Hall of Fame (1991) and lifetime-achievement (2000) awards. He also performed at last year's opening of the Experience Music Project. Scott taught himself piano and guitar, and started out playing gospel music, once touring the West Coast with the Five Blind Boys of Mississippi. In 1974, he turned his attention to blues, with a sound flavored by his love of Seattle-born guitar legend Jimi Hendrix. Like Albert Collins, an early influence, Scott played electric guitar with his thumb instead of a pick, which contributed to his distinctive sound. He also was known for his stamina, often playing two- and three-hour sets.

OCMS2001 ~ Tommy Flanagan, a jazz pianist who worked with such artists as Ella Fitzgerald, died of an arterial aneurysm. He was 71. Flanagan, part of his own classic jazz trio, accompanied Fitzgerald for 20 years, also acting as her musical director. He also worked for Tony Bennett. He became a celebrated figure in jazz with such trio albums as "Jazz Poet" (1989) and "Let's" (1993). Flanagan's trio included bassists George Mraz and Peter Washington, and drummers Kenny Washington, Lewis Nash and Albert Heath. Flanagan won the distinguished Danish Jazzpar Prize in 1993. Born in Detroit, Flanagan was the youngest of six children. He recorded "Sunset and the Mockingbird: The Birthday Concert," live at the Vanguard in 1998. He was to appear at Iridium this holiday season.

17

OCMS1569 ~ Birth of German organist and composer Paul Sartorius in Nuremberg. d-28 February 1609, Innsbruck.

OCMS1615 ~ Birth of French violinist and composer Guillaume Dumanoir, II. He composed dance music enjoyed by Louis XIV

OCMS1667 ~ Death of composer Nathaniel Schnittelbach, at 34. b-1633.



OCMS1715 ~ Birth of composer Girolamo Abos on the island of Malta. Italian opera and church music.

OCMS1720 ~ Birth of Italian composer Carlo Antonio Campioni.

OCMS1757 ~ Birth of American composer Daniel Read, of the First New England School, and one of the primary figures in early American classical music. d-4 DEC 1836.

OCMS1766 ~ Birth of French violinist, teacher and composer Rodolphe Kreutzer in Versailles. In 1810 broken arm ended virtuoso career. Beethoven dedicated sonata op 47 to him. d-Geneva, 6 JAN 1831.



OCMS1775 ~ Death of German composer Karl Marian Paradeiser, at 28.

OCMS1780 ~ Birth of English composer Robert Archibald Smith.

OCMS1829 ~ Birth of Russian pianist, conductor and composer Anton Rubenstein.

OCMS1840 ~ Birth of composer Frederick Scotson Clark.

OCMS1848 ~ Frederic Chopin played his final piano concert at a Polish benefit ball at Guildhall in London.

OCMS1850 ~ Giuseppe Verdi's opera StifellioĘwas first performed at the Teatro Grande in Trieste despite difficulties with the censors which resulted in cuts and changes.

OCMS1852 ~ Birth of American soprano Minnie Hauk in NYC. d-near Lucerne, 6 FEB 1929.

OCMS1854 ~ First Performance of Anton Rubinstein's Ocean Symphony in Leipzig.

OCMS1860 ~ Birth of Viennese harpist Edmund Scheucker.

OCMS1861 ~ Birth of composer Vaclav Suk.

OCMS1861 ~ First Performance of Johannes Brahms' Piano Quintet No. 1 in g, Op. 25, at a rehearsal in Hamburg, with pianist Clara Schumann.

OCMS1862 ~ The work noted above received its official premiere with members of the Hellmesberger Quartet; Brahms at the piano, in Vienna.

OCMS1870 ~ Birth of Australian composer Alfred Hill in Melbourne. d-Sydney, 30 OCT 1960.

OCMS1894 ~ Debut of opera star Enrico Caruso in Mario Morelli's L'Amico Francesco at Naples Teatro Nuovo.   1877 ~ The first production of Gilbert and Sullivan's opera, The Sorcerer, was presented, in London.

OCMS1891 ~ Poland's premier and premier ivory tickler, Ignace Jan Paderewski, made his American debut at Carnegie Hall in New York City. In later years, Paderewski, who suffered from arthritis, settled in Paso Robles, CA. The hot mineral baths located there eased his pain. He played only Steinway grand pianos custom-built to his specifications. In fact, five were made just for his use.

OCMS1925 ~ Sir Charles Mackerras, Australian conductor

OCMS1930 ~ David Amram, American composer and French-horn player

OCMS1938 ~ Gordon Lightfoot, Canadian folk singer, songwriter and guitarist

OCMS1938 ~ Orchestra leader Kay Kyser, speaking to an audience at the College of the City of New York (CCNY) told of the "inner workings and artistic features of swing music." It marked the first of a series of lectures on swing music presented by Kyser, who went on to present The Kollege of Musical Knowledge on radio.

OCMS1941 ~ Gene Clark, Singer, guitar with The Byrds

OCMS1942 ~ Bob Gaudio, Singer with The Royal Teens; The Four Seasons

OCMS1946 ~ Martin Barre, Guitarist with Jethro Tull

OCMS1950 ~ Roberta Peters filled in for the lead in Mozart's Don Giovanni, making her debut at the Metropolitan Opera in New York City. She would become one of the Met's most famous stars.

OCMS1962 ~ The 4 Seasons, with Frankie Valli as lead singer, began a five-week run at the top of the tunedex with Big Girls Don't Cry.

OCMS1967 ~ Ronald DeVoe, Singer with New Edition

OCMS1970 ~ Elton John recorded an album live, on what was WABC-FM in New York City. It marked the first time that a concert was aired live and recorded for release as aired. The LP was titled, 11/17/70.

OCMS1981 ~ Bob Eberly died

OCMS2001 ~ Jerry Jerome, a tenor sax player who was a featured soloist with the bands of Glenn Miller and Benny Goodman, died of leukemia. He was 89. One of the big names in the Big Band era, Jerome was a featured soloist with the Glenn Miller, Benny Goodman, Red Norvo and Artie Shaw orchestras. He then became a successful musical director and conductor on radio and television. Jerome also established a music business, scoring and arranging commercial jingles. Three years ago, Arbors Records released Jerome's "Something Old, Something New." The sequel recording, "Something Borrowed, Something Blue," will be released in December. Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., Jerome started playing the sax while in high school. He attended the University of Alabama and went on the medical school, playing gigs at jazz clubs to earn tuition money. He joined Goodman's orchestra at the height of its popularity in 1938. When Goodman broke up his band in 1940, Jerome joined Shaw. While with Shaw, he appeared in the film "Second Chorus," with Fred Astaire and Burgess Meredith.

OCMS2003 ~ Arthur Conley, a 1960s soul singer and protege of Otis Redding's, died at his home in the town of Ruurlo, in the eastern Netherlands. He was 57. Conley was born in Atlanta and started his recording career in 1959 as leader of the group Arthur and the Corvets. He was best known for his 1967 hit, Sweet Soul Music, which he co-wrote with Redding based on a number by Sam Cooke. Conley had several minor hits in the following two years. He moved to Europe in the early 1970s after several tours of the continent, deciding that he was "fed up with the pressure" in the United States, said Giesen. In the Netherlands, Conley appeared on television and radio, and ran an independent record label. In the last five years he was an adviser to The Original Sixties R&B and Soul Show, which sought to reproduce the sound and look of the heyday of soul.

18    1307 ~ The story of William Tell shooting the apple off of his young son's head is said to have taken place on this day. Gioachino Rossini made this story into an opera.



OCMS 1680 ~ Birth of French-Belgian composer and flutist Jean Baptiste Loeillet in Gent. d-London, 19 JUL 1730.



OCMS 1736 ~ Birth of German composer Carl Friedrich Christian Fasch in Zerbst. d-Berlin, 3 AUG 1800.

OCMS 1741 Ę~ George Frideric Handel arrived in Dublin at the invitation of the country of Ireland to attend current concert season. He presented numerous concerts in the Irish capital, including the first performanceĘof his oratorio Messiah early in 1742.



OCMS 1763 ~ Leopold Mozart and his two children, Wolfgang and Maria, arrive in Paris on their European concert tour.

OCMS 1786 ~ Carl Maria von Weber, German composer, conductor and pianist, began the era of German romantic music More information about von Weber

OCMS 1838 ~ Sir William Schwenck Gilbert, British playright and librettist, best known for his comic operettas with Arthur Sullivan

OCMS 1859 ~ Birth of Russian composer and pianist Sergei Mikhailovich Liapunov, in Yaroslavl. d-Paris, 1924.


OCMS 1888 ~ First Performance of Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky's 5th Symphony, in St. Petersburg.

OCMS 1889 ~ Amelita Galli-Curci, Opera soprano, "If not the greatest coloratura soprano of all time, she must surely be recognized as among the world's finest examples of true operatic artistry."

OCMS 1891 ~ĘFirst Performance of Tchaikovsky's symphonic work The Voyevode in Moscow.

OCMS 1892 ~ First concert at Carnegie Hall by the New York Philharmonic.

OCMS 1899 ~ Eugene Ormandy (Jeno Blau), Hungarian-born American conductor of The Philadelphia Orchestra More information about Ormandy

OCMS 1909 ~ Johnny (John Herndon) Mercer, Academy Award-winning composer, lyricist, wrote or co-wrote over a thousand songs

OCMS 1926 ~ Dorothy Collins (Marjorie Chandler), Singer on Your Hit Parade, sang with Benny Goodman band

OCMS 1936 ~ Hank Ballard, Singer, songwriter with The Midniters, wrote and recorded The Twist More about Hank Ballard

OCMS 1950 ~ Graham Parker, Singer with Graham Parker and The Rumour

OCMS 1953 ~ Herman Rarebell, Drummer with Scorpions

OCMS 1960 ~ Kim Wilde, Singer

OCMS 1967 ~ Lulu's To Sir with Love, from the movie of the same name, started its fifth and final week at number one.

OCMS 1974 ~ Frank Sinatra emerged from retirement to do a TV special with dancer Gene Kelly. The show was a smash hit and revived Sinatra's career.

OCMS 1975 ~ John Denver received a gold record for I'm Sorry.

OCMS 1986 ~ The Roseland Ballroom reopened in New York City. The 67-year-old home for those wanting to dance cheek to cheek featured America's dean of society music, Lester Lanin. He played for patrons who wanted to cut a rug on the 112-by-55-foot, maple wood dance floor.

OCMS 1999 ~ Doug Sahm passed away

OCMS 2003 ~ First Performance of John Corigliano's Snapshot: Circa 1909. Elements String Quartet at Merkin Concert Hall, NYC.

OCMS 2003 ~ Oscar-nominated composer, conductor and arranger Michael Kamen, one of Hollywood's most sought-after musicians, died at age 55 after suffering from multiple sclerosis for several years. The native New Yorker and Juilliard School of Music Graduate was one of Hollywood's most successful composers who worked on music for the "Lethal Weapon" series and scored "Die Hard" among many other films. In the late 1960s, he helped found the New York Rock 'n' Roll Ensemble, a critically acclaimed group that fused classical with pop and recorded five albums before dissolving. In the 1970s, Kamen scored ballets, served as musical director for David Bowie's "Diamond Dogs" tour and began writing scores for film. Although he began in Hollywood working on offbeat films like "Polyester" and "Brazil," he turned more mainstream in the 1980s, working on the "Lethal Weapon" series, "Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves," "Mr. Holland's Opus" and "X-Men," plus the HBO series "Band of Brothers." In 1991, Kamen earned his first Academy Award nomination for "(Everything I Do) I Do It for You," the Bryan Adams pop hit from the movie, "Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves." Co-written with Adams and Robert John "Mutt" Lange, the song received two Grammys. The three united in 1993 for "All for Love." In 1999, Kamen conducted the orchestra which backed Metallica on their S&M project.

19     

OCMS1724 ~ First Performance of J. S. Bach's Sacred Cantata No. 26 Ach wie flüchtig, ach wie nichtig performed on the 24th Sunday following Trinity. A portion of Bach's second annual Sacred Cantata cycle in Leipzig, 1724-25.

OCMS1736 ~ J. S. Bach named court composer by Poland's King Agustus III.

OCMS1739 ~ First Performance of Jean-Philippe Rameau's opera Dardanus in Paris.

OCMS1826 ~ Composer Felix Mendelssohn and his sister Fanny performed his overture to "A Midsummer Night's Dream" for the first time.



OCMS1828 ~ Death of Austrian composer Franz Schubert in Vienna, at the age of 31 from typhus. He is buried near Beethoven.

OCMS1859 ~ Mikhail Ippolitov-Ivanov, Russian composer and conductor More information about Ippolitov-Ivanov

OCMS1874 ~ Birth of composer Karl Adrian Wohlfahrt.

OCMS1875 ~ First Performance of Tchaikovsky's Third Symphony, in Moscow.



OCMS1888 ~ Piano Debut in Boston of composer Edward MacDowell with the Kneisel Quartet.



OCMS1905 ~ Tommy Dorsey, American trombonist and bandleader

OCMS1923 ~ First Performances of Béla Bartók's Five Dances and Zoltán Kodály's Psalums Hungaricus in Budapest, marking the 50th anniversary of the union of cities Buda and Pest.

OCMS1936 ~ Birth of classical music commentator (Detroit Symphony broadcasts) Dick Cavett, in Kearney, Nebraska. ABC-TV talk show host (Dick Cavett Show).

OCMS1936 ~ First concert recorded on magnetic tape with the London Philharmonic orchestra conducted by Sir Thomas Beecham at BASF's own concert hall in Ludwigshaven, Germany.

OCMS1937 ~ Ray Collins, Songwriter

OCMS1938 ~ Hank Medress, Singer with The Tokens, record producer

OCMS1943 ~ Fred Lipsius, Piano, sax with Blood Sweat & Tears

OCMS1943 ~ Stan Kenton and his orchestra recorded Artistry in Rhythm, the song that later become the Kenton theme. It was Capitol record number 159. The other side of the disk was titled, Eager Beaver.

OCMS1944 ~ Agnes Baltsa, Greek mezzo-soprano

OCMS1954 ~ Sammy Davis, Jr. was involved in a serious auto accident in San Bernardino, CA. Three days later, Davis lost the sight in his left eye. He later referred to the accident as the turning point of his career.

OCMS1957 ~ American conductor Leonard Bernstein named Music Director of the New York Philharmonic. First American-born and educated conductor named to head an important American Orchestra.

OCMS1961 ~ A year after Chubby Checker reached the #1 spot with The Twist, the singer appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show to sing the song again. The Twist became the first record to reach #1 a second time around, on January 13, 1962.

OCMS1962 ~ For the first time, a jazz concert was presented at the White House. Jazz had previously been served as background music only.

OCMS2000 ~ First Performance of Philip Glass' Double Concerto for Timpani and Orchestra, by the American Composers Orchestra. Lincoln Center in New York. 2004 ~ Composer Cy Coleman, who wrote the musical "Sweet Charity" and whose songs included such Frank Sinatra classics as Witchcraft, Big Spender and The Best is Yet to Come, died at the age 75 More information about Cy Coleman

20    1894 ~ Anton Rubinstein, Russian composer and pianist, died
More information about Rubinstein

OCMS1925 ~ June Christy (Shirley Luster), Singer, sang with Stan Kenton band

OCMS1929 ~ Leo Reisman and his orchestra recorded Happy Days are Here Again for Victor Records. The classic was recorded just three weeks after the stock market crash that plunged the nation into the Great Depression.

OCMS1937 ~ Ruth Laredo, American pianist

OCMS1940 ~ Tony Butala, Singer with The Lettermen

OCMS1942 ~ Norman Greenbaum, Singer

OCMS1943 ~ Meredith Monk, American composer, dancer, choreographer and singer

OCMS1946 ~ Duane Allman, Guitarist with The Allman Brothers Band

OCMS1946 ~ Ray Stiles, Bass, singer with Mud

OCMS1947 ~ George Grantham, Drummer, singer with Poco

OCMS1947 ~ Joe Walsh, Guitarist, singer with he Eagles; James Gang

OCMS1948 ~ Barbara Hendricks, American soprano

OCMS1957 ~ Jimmy Brown, Drummer with UB40

OCMS1959 ~ One of America's great rock jocks was fired from WABC radio in New York. The 'Moondoggy' himself, Alan Freed, was axed in the midst of the payola music scandal.

OCMS1966 ~ Cabaret opened on Broadway for the first of 1,166 stellar performances. Joel Gray starred in the hugely successful musical that is an adaptation of both the play, "I Am a Camera", and the novel, "Goodbye to Berlin".

OCMS1971 ~ Isaac Hayes of Memphis, TN got his first #1 hit as the Theme from Shaft began a two-week stay at the top of the charts.

OCMS1984 ~ The largest crowd to see the unveiling of a Hollywood Walk-of-Fame star turned out as Michael Jackson got his piece of the sidewalk right in front of Mann's Chinese Theatre in Los Angeles. 'The Gloved One' became star number 1,793 on the famed walk.

OCMS2003 ~ Katherine Bidwell, who supported performing arts programs and held positions at the Metropolitan Opera Guild and Lincoln Center, died. She was 66. A musician herself, Bidwell joined the St. Louis Municipal Opera when she was 18. She became a trustee at Sarah Lawrence College, her alma mater, and sponsored performing arts programs there. In 1966, Bidwell joined the board of the Metropolitan Opera Guild. She was its president and chief executive from 1979 to 1986, and for the next 10 years, she was director of special projects for Lincoln Center. Bidwell founded the Katherine Bidwell Foundation for Young Singers and the patrons' program of the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center. She was a trustee of several other organizations, including Westminster Choir College and the London School of Music and Dramatic Arts.

21    1710 ~ Bernardo Pasquini

OCMS1877 ~ Thomas A. Edison, who really enjoyed the jazz he heard coming from his newest invention, told those gathered that he just invented the 'talking machine' (phonograph). On February 19, 1878, Edison received a patent for the device.

OCMS1904 ~ Coleman Hawkins, American jazz tenor saxophonist, solo with the Fletcher Henderson band, jazz bandleader

OCMS1931 ~ Malcolm Williamson, Australian composer

OCMS1933 ~ Jean Shepard, Country singer

OCMS1934 ~ Cole Porter's Anything Goes opened at the Alvin Theatre in New York City. The show ran for 420 performances.

OCMS1936 ~ James DePreist, Orchestra leader with the Oregon Symphony

OCMS1937 ~ Following Carnegie Hall performances in both 1906 and 1919, Artur Rubinstein presented another historic and highly acclaimed performance at the arts center this day.
More information about Rubinstein

OCMS1940 ~ Dr. John ('Mac' Malcolm John Rebennack), Organ, guitar, singer, songwriter

OCMS1940 ~ Natalia Makarova, Ballerina with the Kirov Ballet (now Saint Petersburg Ballet) from 1959 until 1970

OCMS1944 ~ Happy trails to you, until we meet again.... The Roy Rogers Show was first heard on the Mutual Broadcasting System. Singing along with Roy ('The King of the Cowboys'), were the Whippoorwills and The Sons of the Pioneers.

OCMS1944 ~ I'm Beginning to See the Light, the song that would become the theme song for Harry James and his orchestra, was recorded this day. The song featured the lovely voice of Kitty Kallen (Little Things Mean a Lot).

OCMS1948 ~ Lonnie (LeRoy) Jordan, Keyboards, singer

OCMS1950 ~ Livingston Taylor, American folk singer, songwriter and guitarist, brother of singer James Taylor

OCMS1952 ~ Lorna Luft, Singer, actress, daughter of singer-actress Judy Garland and producer Sid Luft; sister of singer-actress Liza Minnelli

OCMS1955 ~ The first lady of the American stage, Helen Hayes, was honored for her many remarkable years in show business, as the Fulton Theatre in New York City was renamed the Helen Hayes Theatre.

OCMS1959 ~ Following his firing from WABC Radio in New York the day before, Alan Freed refused "on principle" to sign a statement that he never received money or gifts (payola) for plugging records. Incidentally, few may remember, but Freed left WABC while he was on the air. He was replaced in mid~record by Fred Robbins, who later became a nationally~known entertainment reporter for Mutual Radio.

OCMS1981 ~ Olivia Newton-John started the first of 10 weeks at the top of the pop music charts when Physical became the music world's top tune.

OCMS1990 ~ Instrument lovers have paid some pretty awesome prices for violins made by Antonio Stradivari. But a red Strad owned by the family of composer Felix Mendelssohn sold on this day for an all-time high of $1,700,00.

OCMS2001 ~ Ralph Burns, who won Academy Awards, an Emmy and a Tony as a music arranger after making a name for himself in jazz as a piano player in the Woody Herman band, died at the age of 79. Burns collected his first Academy Award for adapting the musical score of the

OCMS1972 movie "Cabaret." He won another Oscar for adapting the musical score for "All That Jazz," an Emmy for television's "Baryshnikov on Broadway" and a Tony in 1999 for the Broadway musical "Fosse." His other film credits included "Lenny," "In The Mood," "Urban Cowboy," "Annie," "My Favorite Year" and "The Muppets Take Manhattan." He also collaborated with Jule Styne on "Funny Girl" and Richard Rodgers on "No Strings." The Massachusetts native, who took up piano as a child, was playing in dance bands in Boston when he was 12, graduating to jazz orchestras by his teens. He worked with Herman band's for 15 years as both a writer and piano player, composing some of the group's biggest hits. Among them were "Apple Honey," "Bijou" and the three-part "Summer Sequence." "Early Autumn," written later as a fourth movement for "Summer Sequence," became a hit with singers after Johnny Mercer supplied words for it. Later, Burns worked in the studio with such popular singers as Tony Bennett, Johnny Mathis, Ray Charles, Aretha Franklin and Natalie Cole.

OCMS2003 ~ Teddy Randazzo, co-author of more than 600 songs for acts including The Temptations and Frank Sinatra, died at the age of 68. With co-author Bobby Weinstein and others, Randazzo wrote hits such as Goin' Out of My Head, Hurt So Bad and It's Gonna Take a Miracle for acts such as Little Anthony and the Imperials, The Lettermen, Linda Ronstadt, The Temptations and Sinatra. Randazzo began his career at age 15 as lead singer of the group The Three Chuckles. The group's first hit, Runaround, rose to No. 20 on the Billboard charts and sold more than 1 million copies. Randazzo started a solo career in 1957 and found modest success over the next seven years before meeting Weinstein. The duo's songs have been recorded by more than 350 artists, including Gloria Gaynor, Queen Latifah and Luther Vandross. They parted ways in 1970 and Weinstein became an executive for Broadcast Music Inc. and Randazzo became a producer for Motown Records.

22    OCMS Sam F. OCMS

OCMS1880 ~ Lillian Russell made her vaudeville debut, in New York City.

OCMS1899 ~ Hoagy (Hoagland Howard) Carmichael, American jazz pianist and songwriter, singer, band leader, attorney

OCMS1909 ~ Helen Hayes appeared for the first time on the New York stage. She was a member of the cast of In Old Dutch, which opened at the Herald Square Theatre.

1913 ~ Lord Benjamin Britten, British composer Read quotes by and about Britten
More information about Britten Grammy winner

OCMS1925 ~ Gunther Schuller, American composer, conductor, French-horn player and educator

OCMS1938 ~ Bunny Berigan and his orchestra recorded Jelly Roll Blues on Victor Records. The tune became a standard for the band.

OCMS1943 ~ Floyd Sneed, Drummer with Three Dog Night

OCMS1946 ~ Aston Barrett, Musician with 'Family Man', bass with Bob Marley & The Wailers

OCMS1949 ~ Steve 'Miami' Van Zandt, Singer, songwriter, guitar

OCMS1950 ~ Tina (Martina) Weymouth, Bass with Talking Heads

OCMS1953 ~ Craig Hundley, Pianist with the Craig Hundley Trio

OCMS1955 ~ RCA paid the unheard of sum of $25,000 to Sam Phillips of Memphis, TN for the rights to the music of a truck driver from Tupelo, Mississippi: Elvis Presley. Thanks to negotiations with Elvis' manager, Colonel Tom Parker, RCA tossed in a $5,000 bonus as well,for a pink Cadillac for Elvis' mother.

OCMS1957 ~ The Miles Davis Quintet debuted with a jazz concert at Carnegie Hall in New York.

OCMS1965 ~ The production of Man of LaMancha, including the classic The Impossible Dream, opened in New York City for the first of 2,328 performances.

OCMS1975 ~ Dr. Zhivago appeared on TV for the first time. The production, including Somewhere My Love, had earned $93 million from theatre tickets over ten years. NBC paid $4 million for the broadcast rights.

OCMS1977 ~ Tony Orlando returned to the concert stage after a self-imposed, three-month retirement following the suicide death of his good friend, Freddie Prinze. Orlando appeared in concert in San Carlos, California.

OCMS2001 ~ Norman Granz, the impresario who helped make jazz more accessible to the public while making the music business fairer to black performers, died in Geneva, Switzerland, of complications from cancer. He was 83. Granz owned four labels - Clef, Norgran, Verve and Pablo - and at one time or another recorded most of the major names in jazz, including Louis Armstrong, Count Basie, Duke Ellington, Ella Fitzgerald, Dizzy Gillespie, Billie Holiday, Charlie Parker and Oscar Peterson. Many historians credit him with bringing top jazz performers in integrated bands into venues across the country through a series called Jazz at the Philharmonic. Granz's efforts also helped end a system in which white performers generally earned far more than blacks. He insisted on equality in pay, dining and accommodations for his musicians. In 1947, he told Down Beat magazine that he lost $100,000, then a sizable sum, by turning down bookings in segregated concert halls.

23    1666 ~ Guiseppi Guarneri, Italian violin maker

1876 ~ Manuel de Falla, Spanish composer and conductor
More information about de Falla

OCMS1889 ~ The first 'Nickel-in-the-Slot' (jukebox) was placed in service in the Palais Royal Saloon in San Francisco, California. Juke, at the time, was a slang word for a a disorderly house, or house of ill repute. The unit, developed by Louis T. Glass, contained an Edison tinfoil phonograph with four listening tubes. There was a coin slot for each tube. 5 cents bought a few minutes of music. The contraption took in $1,000 in six months!

OCMS1903 ~ Enrico Caruso, famed Italian tenor, made his debut in the United States at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York City. He sang in the role of the Duke in Rigoletto.
More information about Caruso

OCMS1924 ~ Vincent Lopez and some 40 jazz musicians presented a concert of upbeat music at the Metropolitan Opera House in NYC.

OCMS1928 ~ Jerry Bock, American songwriter for the musical theater

1933 ~ Krzysztof Penderecki, Polish
More information about Penderecki

OCMS1935 ~ Ethel Leginska became the first woman to write an opera and conduct it. Her original work, titled Gale, opened at the Chicago City Opera Company.

OCMS1938 ~ Bob Hope and Shirley Ross recorded a song for the film, The Big Broadcast of

OCMS1938. Thanks for the Memory became Decca record number 2219. It also became Hope's theme song.

OCMS1974 ~ Billy Swan reached the #1 spot on the singles charts for the first and only time. I Can Help was the most popular song in the U.S. for two weeks.

24    1848 ~ Lilli Lehmann, German soprano

1868 ~ Scott Joplin, American ragtime composer and pianist
More information about Joplin

OCMS1934 ~ Alfred Schnittke, Soviet composer

OCMS1937 ~ Music from the Raymor Ballroom in Boston, Massachusetts was beamed coast to coast on NBC radio. The special guests during this broadcast were Glenn Miller and his orchestra.

OCMS1937 ~ Three lovely ladies, known as The Andrews Sisters, recorded Decca record number

OCMS1562 this day. It became one of their biggest hits: Bei Mir Bist Du Schön.

OCMS1950 ~ The musical comedy, Guys and Dolls, from the pen of Frank Loesser, opened at the 46th Street Theatre in New York City. The show ran for 1,200 performances.

OCMS1958 ~ Jackie Wilson's Lonely Teardrops was released, as was a disk by Ritchie Valens featuring Donna on one side and La Bamba on the other.

OCMS1958 ~ Harold Jenkins, who changed his name to Conway Twitty, got his first #1 hit on this day. It's Only Make Believe was the most popular song in the U.S. for one week.

OCMS1972 ~ A Friday night show that would compete head-to-head with NBC's Midnight Special premiered. In Concert featured Chuck Berry, Alice Cooper, Blood Sweat and Tears, Seals and Crofts and Poco. Robert W. Morgan of KHJ, Los Angeles was the offstage announcer for the ABC-TV show that was staged before a live audience. In Concert was the creation of the guy who dreamed up the fictitious group The Archies and brought fame to The Monkees: rock promoter, Don Kirshner.

OCMS1973 ~ Following over two years of retirement, Frank Sinatra went back to work again with a TV special on NBC titled, "Ol' Blue Eyes is Back". Despite the fact that the show finished third in the ratings (in a three-show race), at least one critic called the program, “The best popular music special of the year.”

OCMS1976 ~ The Band, appearing at the Winterland in San Francisco, announced that this was to be the group's last public performance.

OCMS1985 ~ Big Joe Turner passed away

OCMS1993 ~ Albert Collins, passed away

OCMS2003 ~ Teddy Wilburn, half of the country music duo the Wilburn Brothers, died. He was 71. Wilburn and his brother, Doyle, had 30 songs on the country charts from 1955 to 1972, including the hits Hurt Her Once for Me, Trouble's Back in Town and Roll, Muddy River. Doyle Wilburn died of cancer in 1982. Teddy Wilburn was born in the Ozark Mountain community of Hardy, Ark. He and Doyle first performed publicly at ages 6 and 5, with the Wilburn Family band. After recording on Decca records as the Wilburn Brothers, Teddy and Doyle joined the Grand Ole Oprycast. Between 1963 and 1974, the Wilburn Brothers were hosts of one of country music's first syndicated color TV shows. In 1972 they were nominated for the Country Music Association's Vocal Group of the Year award.

25    OCMS Fairfax County Student Holiday OCMS Have a Happy and Blessed Thanksgiving! Thanksgiving Books, CD's and Videos Thanksgiving Fun Thanksgiving Music 1896 ~ Virgil Thomson, American composer, conductor and music critic Read quotes by and about Thomson
More information about Thomson

OCMS1924 ~ Paul Desmond, American jazz also saxophonist and composer

OCMS1925 ~ Derroll Adams, Country singer, played with Jack Elliott

OCMS1931 ~ Nat Adderley, Musician, cornet, mellophone, French horn, trumpet, brother of Cannonball Adderley

OCMS1941 ~ Percy Sledge, Singer

OCMS1949 ~ Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer, by Johnnie Marks, appeared on the music charts and became THE musical hit of the Christmas season. Although Gene Autry's rendition is the most popular, 80 different versions of the song have been recorded, with nearly 20,000,000 copies sold.

OCMS1955 ~ Following a summer at the top of the American pop charts, Rock Around the Clock by Bill Haley and His Comets became the #1 song in Great Britain.

OCMS1959 ~ Steve Rothery, Guitarist with Marillion

OCMS1960 ~ Amy Grant, Singer

OCMS1966 ~ Stacey Lattisaw, Singer

26    1789 ~ Thanksgiving was celebrated nationally for the first time in the United States.

OCMS1925 ~ Eugene Istomin, American pianist
More about Istomin

OCMS1932 ~ Alan Stout, American composer

OCMS1933 ~ Robert Goulet (Stanley Applebaum), Singer, actor

OCMS1935 ~ Marian Mercer, Singer, actress

OCMS1938 ~ Ray Brown, Singer with The Four Freshmen

OCMS1938 ~ Tina Turner (Annie Bullock), American soul-rock singer, Grammy Award-winning Pop Singer of the Year, 1985; Ike Turner's ex-wife

OCMS1940 ~ Xavier Cugat and his orchestra recorded Orchids in the Moonlight on the Columbia label.

OCMS1944 ~ Alan Henderson, Bass with Them

OCMS1946 ~ John McVie, Guitarist with Fleetwood Mac

OCMS1956 ~ Tommy Dorsey passed away at the age of 51. His records sold more than 110,000,000 copies.

OCMS1963 ~ Amelita Galli-Curci passed away

OCMS1968 ~ Cream gave a farewell performance filmed by the BBC in London. The rock group played before a capacity crowd at Royal Albert Hall.

OCMS1969 ~ The Band received a gold record for the album, The Band.

OCMS1978 ~ Frank Rosolino passed away

OCMS1980 ~ "Wings Over America" premiered in New York City. The movie is about the first American tour of Paul McCartney and Wings.

OCMS2001 ~ Paul Hume, a music critic who once drew the ire of President Harry Truman after he panned his daughter's recital, died of pneumonia at his home in Baltimore. Hume was 85. Hume worked for The Washington Post and built a reputation as one of the most learned critics in the nation. Classical music legends Vladimir Horowitz, Eugene Ormandy and Leonard Bernstein all held Hume in high esteem. Hume will always be remembered for his review of a recital by Truman's daughter, Margaret, in 1950, in which he criticized her singing as flat. After reading the review, Truman wrote an angry, threatening letter to Hume. Truman's remarks got him in hot water with the public, which felt he shouldn't take time to joust with critics as the nation fought the Korean War. A Chicago native, Hume taught music history at Georgetown University from 1950 to 1977 and was a visiting professor at Yale University from 1975 to 1983. He wrote several books, including a study of Catholic church music and a biography of Giuseppe Verdi.

OCMS2003 ~ Meyer Kupferman, a prolific composer whose work ranged from contemporary classical music to opera, ballet and jazz, died. He was 77. Kupferman, a virtuoso clarinetist, taught composition and music theory at Sarah Lawrence College, where he was a staff member from 1951 to 1993. During his tenure there, he also served as chair of the music department and conducted the orchestra, chorus and chamber improvisation ensemble. In 1948 Kupferman wrote both his first piano concerto and opera. In all, he produced seven operas, 12 symphonies, nine ballets, seven string quartets,

OCMS10 concertos and hundreds of chamber works. His compositions have been performed and recorded worldwide. Kupferman also was commissioned by the Hudson Valley Philharmonic to write 'FDR' for the centennial of Franklin Roosevelt's birth. The manuscript of the piece is now held by the Roosevelt Library. William Anderson, a family friend and a guitarist who performed Kupferman's music, told the New York Times that Kupferman died of heart failure.

27    OCMS 1471 ~ Guillaume Du Fay, French composer, died. Considered the leading composer of the early Renaissance.
More information about Du Fay

OCMS1750 ~ Anton Thadaus Johann Nepomuk Stamitz

OCMS1804 ~ Sir Julius Benedict, Musician, composer

OCMS1813 ~ Michele Puccini, Composer

OCMS1867 ~ Charles (Louis Eug'ne) Koechlin, French composer. He studied under Massenet and Fauré at the Paris Conservatoire. He excelled in colourful and inventive orchestration in his symphonies, symphonic poems, choral- orchestral works (including seven based on Kipling's Jungle Book), film music, and works inspired by Hollywood, such as the Seven Stars Symphony. He also wrote prolifically for a wide range of vocal and chamber combinations. His writings included studies of recent French music and treatises on music theory.

OCMS1900 ~ Leon Barzin, Belgian conductor (NY City Ballet 1948-58)

OCMS1904 ~ Sir Julius Benedict, German-born English conductor and composer

OCMS1912 ~ David Merrick (Margulois), Broadway producer of Gypsy, Hello, Dolly!, Beckett, Oliver, Fanny, Stop the World: I Want to Get Off, 42nd Street

OCMS1926 ~ Louis 'Satchmo' Armstrong recorded You Made Me Love You on Okeh Records.

OCMS1935 ~ Al Jackson, Jr., Dummer with Booker T. and the M.G.'s; Roy Milton Band

OCMS1935 ~ Eeny Meeny Miney Mo was recorded by Ginger Rogers and Johnny Mercer. The tune was recorded at Decca Records in Los Angeles.

OCMS1942 ~ Jimi (James Marshall) Hendrix, American rock guitarist, singer and songwriter

OCMS1944 ~ Dozy (Trevor Davies), Bass with Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick and Tich

OCMS1944 ~ Eddie Rabbitt, Songwriter, Kentucky Rain for Elvis Presley; singer, his

OCMS17 albums garnered 26 #1 country hits and 8 pop hits

OCMS1953 ~ Boris Grebenshikov, Russian rock musician

OCMS1959 ~ Charlie Burchill, Guitarist with Simple Minds

OCMS1967 ~ The Association, a California group, earned a gold record for the hit Never My Love, on Warner Bros. Records. The group also earned worldwide fame for other hits including Windy, Cherish and Along Comes Mary.

OCMS1982 ~ The #1 song in the U.S. was former Commodore Lionel Richie's Truly. The love song stayed at the top of the charts for two weeks. The song was his first solo hit and followed Endless Love, a duet with Diana Ross in 1981.

OCMS2000 ~ Walter Bailes, a member of the popular 1940s-era Grand Ole Opry duo The Bailes Brothers, died at the age of 80. Walter Bailes, a West Virginia native, and his brother Johnny were the classic Bailes Brothers duo. Brothers Kyle and Homer also performed with the group over the years in varying combinations. Walter wrote much of the group's material, including popular songs like Dust on the Bible and I Want to be Loved. During their run on the Grand Ole Opry from 1944 to 46, they were among the show's most popular acts. Kitty Wells, Flatt & Scruggs, and The Everly Brothers all recorded songs written by Walter Bailes. The Bailes Brothers left the Opry in 1946 and moved to Shreveport, La., where they helped launch the Louisiana Hayride radio show. They continued to occasionally perform throughout the 1950s.

28    OCMS 1632 ~ Jean-Baptiste Lully, Italian-born French composer
More information about Lully

1829 ~ Anton Rubinstein, Russian composer and pianist
More information about Rubinstein

OCMS1895 ~ Joseé Iturbi, Musician, pianist, conductor of the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra

OCMS1915 ~ Dick Vance, Trumpeter

OCMS1929 ~ Berry Gordy, Jr., Founder of Motown Records

OCMS1934 ~ Ethel Ennis, Singer with Benny Goodman Orchestra

OCMS1939 ~ Gary Troxel, Singer with The Fleetwoods

OCMS1940 ~ Bruce Channel, Singer

1943 ~ Randy (Randall Stuart) Newman, American pop-rock songwriter, singer and pianist
More information about Newman Grammy winner

OCMS1945 ~ R.B. Greaves, Singer

OCMS1948 ~ Beeb Birtles, Guitarist with The Little River Band

OCMS1949 ~ Alexander Godunov, Ballet dancer, actor

OCMS1949 ~ Paul Shaffer, Band leader on Late Show with David Letterman, comedian

OCMS1956 ~ Holding the #1 spot on the music charts: Guy Mitchell singing Singing the Blues. The song remained at the top of the Hit Parade for 10 weeks. Here's a bit of trivia: Ray Conniff whistled the intro to Singing the Blues.

OCMS1966 ~ The New Vaudeville Band received a gold record for Winchester Cathedral this day.

OCMS1974 ~ John Lennon appeared in concert for the last time, at NYC's Madison Square Garden. Lennon joined Elton John to sing Whatever Gets You Through the Night as well as I Saw Her Standing There.

29    1770 ~ Peter Hansel, composer

1797 ~ Gaetano Donizetti, Italian composer
More information about Donizetti

OCMS1825 ~ Rossini's Barber of Seville was presented in New York City. It was the first Italian opera to be presented in the United States.

OCMS1877 ~ Thomas Alva Edison demonstrated a hand-cranked sound recording phonograph machine that was capable of recording human voice and other sounds.

OCMS1895 ~ Busby Berkeley (William Berkeley Enos), Director of Forty Second Street, Gold Diggers of 1935, Footlight Parade, Hollywood Hotel, Stage Struck, Gold Diggers in Paris, Babes in Arms, Strike Up the Band, Girl Crazy, Take Me Out to the Ball Game, Babes on Broadway, For Me and My Gal

OCMS1915 ~ Billy Strayhorn, American jazz composer, lyricist and pianist

OCMS1917 ~ Merle Travis, Songwriter, singer

OCMS1932 ~ John Gary (Strader), Singer, songwriter, diver, inventor. He holds two patents on underwater propulsion devices - diving buddy and aqua-peller

OCMS1932 ~ Ed Bickert, Jazz guitarist with Paul Desmond Quartet

OCMS1932 ~ The Gay Divorcee opened in New York City. The Cole Porter musical featured the classic, Night and Day.

OCMS1933 ~ John Mayall, Songwriter, bandleader

OCMS1938 ~ Tommy Dorsey and his orchestra recorded Hawaiian War Chant for Victor Records.

OCMS1939 ~ Meco (Monardo), Musician, music producer

OCMS1940 ~ Chuck Mangione, American jazz musician (flugelhorn) and Grammy Award-winning composer

OCMS1941 ~ Denny Doherty, Singer with Mamas and Papas, TV host

OCMS1944 ~ Felix Cavaliere, Singer with The (Young) Rascals

OCMS1947 ~ Louis Armstrong and his sextet lit up Carnegie Hall in New York City with a night of jazz and more.

OCMS1948 ~ The first opera to be televised was broadcast from the Metropolitan Opera House in New York City. Othello, by Verdi, was presented over WJZ-TV.

OCMS1950 ~ I Fly Anything, starring singer Dick Haymes in the role of cargo pilot Dockery Crane, premiered on ABC Radio. The show only lasted one season and Haymes went back to singing.

OCMS1951 ~ Barry Goudreau, Guitarist with Orion the Hunter; Boston

OCMS1968 - Jonathan Rashleigh Knight, Singer, dancer with New Kids on the Block

OCMS1975 ~ Silver Convention had the #1 pop tune this day, called Fly, Robin, Fly.

OCMS1986 ~ The blockbuster five-record set, Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band Live/1975-85, debuted at #1 on the album charts this day. No five-record set had made the top 25 until then. No five-record set had ever gone platinum until then. The price tag? $25.

OCMS2001 ~ OCMS George Harrison, the "quiet Beatle" who added both rock 'n' roll flash and a touch of the mystic to the band's timeless magic, died. He was 58. Harrison died at 1:30 p.m. at a friend's Los Angeles home following a battle with cancer, longtime friend Gavin De Becker told The Associated Press late Thursday. Harrison's wife, Olivia Harrison, and son, Dhani, 24, were with him. "He left this world as he lived in it, conscious of God, fearless of death, and at peace, surrounded by family and friends," the Harrison family said in a statement. "He often said, 'Everything else can wait but the search for God cannot wait, and love one another."' With the death of Harrison, the band's lead guitarist, there remain two surviving Beatles, Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr. John Lennon was shot to death by a deranged fan in 1980. "I am devastated and very, very sad," McCartney told reporters outside his London home Friday. "He was a lovely guy and a very brave man and had a wonderful sense of humor. He is really just my baby brother." In a statement, Starr said: "George was a best friend of mine. I loved him very much and I will miss him greatly. Both (wife) Barbara and I send our love and light to Olivia and Dhani. We will miss George for his sense of love, his sense of music and his sense of laughter." More about George Harrison

30    1634 ~ Andres de Sola

OCMS1813 ~ Charles-Henri Valentin Alkan, Composer

OCMS1859 ~ Sergei Mikhailovich Liapunov

OCMS1915 ~ "Brownie" McGee, American jazz singer and guitarist

OCMS1931 ~ Thurman 'Teddy' Wilburn, Singer with Wilburn Brothers, Grand Ole Opry More about Wilburn

OCMS1932 ~ Bob Moore, Instrumentalist with Moby Grape

OCMS1935 ~ Jack Reno, Country singer

OCMS1937 ~ (Noel) Paul Stookey, American folk singer, songwriter and guitarist, Peter, Paul and Mary

OCMS1939 ~ Harry James and his big band recorded Concerto for Trumpet on Columbia 78s.

OCMS1940 ~ Lucille Ball and Cuban musician Desi Arnaz were married. Lucy filed for divorce the day after their final TV show was filmed in 1960.

OCMS1943 ~ Nat 'King' Cole and his trio recorded Straighten Up and Fly Right on Capitol Records. It was the first recording for the King Cole trio.

OCMS1943 ~ Leo Lyons, Bass with the Jaybirds

OCMS1944 ~ Rob Grill, Singer with The Grass Roots

OCMS1944 ~ Luther Ingram, Singer

OCMS1945 ~ Radu Lupu, Rumanian pianist

OCMS1945 ~ Roger Glover, Bass with these groups: Episode Six, Rainbow, Deep Purple

OCMS1953 ~ Shuggie (Johnny) Otis, Jr., Guitarist, bass, harmonica and keyboards

OCMS1954 ~ George McArdle, Bass guitarist with Little River Band

OCMS1954 ~ June Pointer, Singer with The Pointer Sisters

OCMS1955 ~ Billy Idol (Broad), Guitarist, singer, songwriter

OCMS1957 ~ John Aston, Guitarist with these groups: Photons, Psychedelic Furs

OCMS1957 ~ Richard Barbieri, Drummer with Japan, composer

OCMS1968 ~ Diana Ross and The Supremes hit the #1 spot on the music charts with Love Child. The somewhat controversial tune (for the times) stayed at the top for two weeks.

OCMS1971 ~ ABC-TV presented Brian's Song as the ABC Movie of the Week. The touching story was about Chicago Bears running back Brian Piccolo and his friendship with Gayle Sayers, who watched Brian die a tragic death. The theme song, Brian's Song, was performed by Michel Legrand.

OCMS1974 ~ The Eagles hit, Best of My Love, was released. It would take until March 1, 1975 for it to reach the #1 spot on the top 40 charts.

OCMS1970 ~ Des'ree, Singer

OCMS1996 ~ Tiny Tim died performing Tiptoe Through the Tulips to an audience at a benefit in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He cut the song short, commenting to his wife, Miss Sue, that he felt ill. As he was making his way with Sue to her table, amidst the applause of his loyal fans, he collapsed, was taken to a Minneapolis hospital and died without regaining consciousness.


Some Composer Birthdays excerpted from
"The Music-Lovers Birthday Book"
published by
The Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, 1987)
~~
Others from various sources, including
Those were the Days
A line of music

Many thanks to Dearest for everything!


 
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